Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy is a primary care, autonomous, client-focused health profession dedicated to improving quality of life by: Promoting optimal mobility, physical activity and overall health and wellness; Preventing disease, injury, and disability; Managing acute and chronic conditions, activity limitations, and participation restrictions; Improving and maintaining optimal functional independence an... Read More

Physiotherapy is a primary care, autonomous, client-focused health profession dedicated to improving quality of life by: Promoting optimal mobility, physical activity and overall health and wellness; Preventing disease, injury, and disability; Managing acute and chronic conditions, activity limitations, and participation restrictions; Improving and maintaining optimal functional independence and physical performance; Rehabilitating injury and the effects of disease or disability with therapeutic exercise programs and other interventions; and Educating and planning maintenance and support programs to prevent re-occurrence, re-injury or functional decline.

Physiotherapy is anchored in movement sciences and aims to enhance or restore function of multiple body systems. The profession is committed to health, lifestyle and quality of life.

This holistic approach incorporates a broad range of physical and physiological therapeutic interventions and aids. Physiotherapy services are those that are performed by physiotherapists or any other trained individuals working under a physiotherapist’s direction and supervision.

Primary Functions Physiotherapists utilize diagnostic and assessment procedures and tools in order to develop and implement preventive and therapeutic courses of intervention. They apply a collaborative and reasoned approach to help clients achieve their health goals, in particular focusing on the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardio-respiratory and multi-systems.

Within these systems, physiotherapists practice practice in areas that include pediatrics, geriatrics, oncology, women’s health, pain, critical care, wound care, occupational health and sports medicine. Physiotherapists analyze the impact of injury, disease, disorders, or lifestyle on movement and function. Their unique contribution to health care is to promote, restore and prolong physical independence by enhancing a client’s functional capacity. Physiotherapists encourage clients to assume responsibility for their health and participate in team approaches to health service delivery.


Chiropractic

Chiropractors are one of the largest primary contact health care professionals in Ontario. You do not require a referral to see a chiropractor. Chiropractic is a non-invasive, manual approach to neuromusculoskeletal issues of the body that includes a patient assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Chiropractors are trained to manage and assess all muscle, spinal, joint and nervous system injur... Read More

Chiropractors are one of the largest primary contact health care professionals in Ontario. You do not require a referral to see a chiropractor.

Chiropractic is a non-invasive, manual approach to neuromusculoskeletal issues of the body that includes a patient assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Chiropractors are trained to manage and assess all muscle, spinal, joint and nervous system injuries often experienced at work, sport, and day to day.

During an initial visit to a chiropractor, a thorough assessment is completed and the diagnosis is communicated to the patient. An appropriate treatment plan is proposed and discussed with the patient in order to assist with pain management, improved function and correcting the source of pain.

Some of the conditions Chiropractors can provide treatment for and help you manage include:
Low back pain
Neck Pain
Shoulder conditions including rotator cuff injury
Elbow conditions including Tennis elbow and Golfers elbow
Thigh and leg pain including sciatica
Knee pain
Repetitive strain injuries
Postural pain
Headaches
Sports injuries
Arthritis
Wrist pain

Services offered by our chiropractor include:
Manual Therapy
Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization
Myofascial Release Therapy
Exercise Prescription
Injury Rehabilitation/Sports Performance
Taping
Chronic Pain Management
Custom Orthotics/Bracing
Compression Stockings


Massage Therapy

Massage is typically initiated by a stressful or painful condition. Massage Therapy relieves muscle tension and pain, also increases flexibility and mobility, and helps clear lactic acid and other waste, which reduces pain and stiffness in muscles and joints. Massage Therapy is also beneficial for the follow symptoms and conditions: Arthritis Anxiety and Depression Neck, Back, and Leg P... Read More

Massage is typically initiated by a stressful or painful condition. Massage Therapy relieves muscle tension and pain, also increases flexibility and mobility, and helps clear lactic acid and other waste, which reduces pain and stiffness in muscles and joints.

Massage Therapy is also beneficial for the follow symptoms and conditions:

Arthritis
Anxiety and Depression
Neck, Back, and Leg Pain
Muscle Tension and Spasm
Bursitis, and Tendinitis
Strains and Sprains
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Jaw Pain, and TMJ
Cancer
Fibromyalgia
Chronic Pain Syndrome
Parkinson’s Disease
Multiple Sclerosis
Sports Injuries
Dislocations
Fractures and Edema
Headaches and Migraines
Pregnancy and Labor Support
Stress and Related tension
Whiplash
WSIB
Massage can improve the overall function of your muscles and joints. It releases tension and/or decreases muscle spasm and helps to release toxins such as lactic acid, which is produced by muscles tissue during exercise.

Your blood and lymph carry nourishment to cells and then carry away waste to be eliminated from the cells. With improved circulation from massage, it encourages better exchange of nutrients at the cellular level.

Studies have shown that massage has positive effects on conditions from colic to hyperactivity, to diabetes to migraines. Studies have also shown that it helps asthmatics breathe easier, improves autistic children’s ability to concentrate, lowers anxiety in depressed adolescents, increases lymph flow rate. It enhances immune function and decreases levels of two stress hormones.


Osteopathy

Osteopathy is a form of therapy that focuses on realigning and balancing the body by working with soft tissue strains such as muscles, joints, ligaments, fascia and visceral. This form of therapy uses a holistic approach that uses hands-on structural manipulation and encourages nervous, circulatory, and lymphatic flow. It focuses on the root cause of pain and instability of the body rather t... Read More

Osteopathy is a form of therapy that focuses on realigning and balancing the body by working with soft tissue strains such as muscles, joints, ligaments, fascia and visceral.

This form of therapy uses a holistic approach that uses hands-on structural manipulation and encourages nervous, circulatory, and lymphatic flow. It focuses on the root cause of pain and instability of the body rather than the symptoms.

Treatments will integrate the body’s innate ability to self-heal and self regulate when free from obstruction, restriction of motion or bony mal-alignment; leading to improved neurovascular supply while improving mechanical and physiological functions of all body systems.

Treatments can help benefit those with:

Back Pain

Neck/Shoulder Pain

Headaches/Migraines

Sciatica

Joint Pain

Pelvic Issues

Digestive Issues

Anxiety/Depression

... and many more!

On your initial visit, a detailed intake and review of your health history is taken, as well as an osteopathic structural assessment and treatment.

Have any questions? Feel free to book a complimentary FREE virtual consultation today!


Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy

What is Pelvic Health Physiotherapy? The pelvic floor muscles are a group of muscles that sit in and around your pelvis. They work together to support the pelvic organs, and are important in proper bladder, bowel, and sexual functioning. Any disturbance in these muscles can result in pelvic pain and dysfunction in the pelvic organs. Pelvic Health Physiotherapy is a specialized type of phy... Read More

What is Pelvic Health Physiotherapy?

The pelvic floor muscles are a group of muscles that sit in and around your pelvis. They work together to support the pelvic organs, and are important in proper bladder, bowel, and sexual functioning. Any disturbance in these muscles can result in pelvic pain and dysfunction in the pelvic organs.

Pelvic Health Physiotherapy is a specialized type of physiotherapy that assesses and treats the conditions that affect the pelvis and pelvic floor muscles.

Various peer-reviewed literature supports the use of Pelvic Health Physiotherapy in the prevention and treatment of incontinence and pelvic pain in both females and males.

What are the conditions we can help treat?

Urinary Incontinence
Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Dysmenorrhea (painful periods)
Dyspareunia (painful intercourse)
Interstitial Cystitis
Bladder Pain Syndrome
Vaginismus
Vulvodynia
Postpartum Pelvic Pain
Coccyx pain
Chronic Prostatitis

What should you expect from Pelvic Health Physiotherapy?

A Pelvic Health Physiotherapist has received specialized training in assessing and treating pelvic floor dysfunction. They can identify issues in the pelvic floor, and through treatment help to improve symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction. Their treatment includes both internal and external manual therapy, education, and exercise prescription.

We recognize that this is a sensitive subject and body area. Therefore, we work hard to maintain an inclusive environment where you can expect to feel respected and well heard.

Pelvic dysfunction can severely impact your life. Pelvic Health Physiotherapy will help get you back to your life and reach your goals.


Manual Lymph Drainage

Manual Lymph Drainage (MLD) Manual Lymph Drainage is necessary to manage fluid volume of the affected extremity to a normal or near normal size. MLD is a type of gentle massage which is intended to encourage the natural drainage of the lymph, which carries waste product away from the tissues back toward the heart. MLD uses a specific amount of low pressure and rhythmic circular movements to ... Read More

Manual Lymph Drainage (MLD)

Manual Lymph Drainage is necessary to manage fluid volume of the affected extremity to a normal or near normal size. MLD is a type of gentle massage which is intended to encourage the natural drainage of the lymph, which carries waste product away from the tissues back toward the heart. MLD uses a specific amount of low pressure and rhythmic circular movements to stimulate lymph flow and re-route it around blocked areas into more centrally located healthy lymphatic vessels, which will eventually drain into the venous system. Bandages are used in the phase 1 and compression garments in phase 2.

The Lymphatic System and Lymphedema

Your lymphatic system plays a large role in immune function and circulation. It consists of lymph vessels meeting up with lymph nodes located in your neck, armpits and groin. As the lymph vessels move fluids out of the tissues, waste products, bacteria, dead cells and large protein molecules are collected. The waste products are carried to the lymph nodes to be broken down and eliminated, while the protein rich fluid is transported back to the heart to rejoin circulation.

When the lymph vessels are unable to transport lymph fluid back to into circulation it accumulates, resulting in chronic swelling. This build- up of protein-rich lymph fluid is known as lymphedema. Once this condition occurs, the swelling may increase if an effective treatment program is not initiated.

If left untreated it may result in hardening skin tissue, enlargement of the tissue channels that transport the lymph fluid, limit the oxygen in the transport system, interfere with wound healing , and provide a culture medium for bacteria that can result in lymphangitis (infection),.

How Does Lymphedema Develop?

There are two types of Lymphedema, Primary and Secondary, which both occur when normal drainage is impaired or disrupted. Lymphedema most often develops in one arm or leg, but may be present in both arms and both legs. It may also occur in the hands or feet, even in the chest, back, neck, face, abdomen and genitals.

Primary Lymphedema

Primary Lymphedema is caused by malformations of the lymphatic system. These malformations are most common in women. Symptoms may be present at birth or may develop later, often during puberty or pregnancy. Primary lymphedema is most common in the legs, but may also occur in the arms and torso.

Secondary Lymphedema

Secondary Lymphedema is a result to damage to the lymphatic system. Surgical procedures such as mastectomies, lumpectomies with radiation and /or removal of lymph nodes are the most common causes. Secondary lymphedema occurs most commonly in the arms, but may also develop in the legs. Other causes may include a traumatic injury, infection, or severe chronic venous insufficiency.

What Are The Symptoms?

Lymphedema may develop within in a few months after a procedure, years later, or not at all. The first obvious sign of lymphedema is swelling characterized by “pitting”. This is recognizable when the skin is depressed for a few seconds and the indentation does not immediately disappear. Other symptoms may include a tightness or heaviness in the affected area or changes in the texture of the skin. You may notice that jewelry and clothing feel tighter.

What To Do If Symptoms Occur?

If your lymphatic system is compromised, this area of the body will have to work much harder to circulate fluid. When it is unable to keep up, swelling and fluid build-up are likely to occur. That is why lymphatic vessels in the compromised area need external support.

What Is The Treatment For Lymphedema?

Once the diagnosis of lymphedema is confirmed, certain treatment procedure are indicated. Since there is no cure for lymphedema, the goal of the treatment is to reduce the swelling and to maintain the reduction. For a majority of patients, this can be achieved by the skillful application of Complete Decongestive Therapy (CDT) which is safe, reliable, and non-invasive. It is proven to provide positive long-term results for both primary and secondary lymphedema. CDT is performed by specially trained therapists. The treatment consists of four components:

Manual Lymph Drainage (MLD)
Graduated Compression Garments or bandages
Meticulous Skin Care
Therapeutic Exercises
TREATMENT

Complete Decongestive Therapy works in two phases, the first being to move the lymph fluid out of the affected area region and reduce the swelling using MLD techniques and bandaging. Ideally these treatments are performed daily, five days a week for 2-4 weeks, depending on the severity. Once the swelling is reduced, the patient is fitted with a graduated compression garment. This marks the second phase, in which the patient plays a large role in his or her ongoing self-care. Wearing graduated compression garments, being meticulous about skin care, and performing self-manual lymph drainage and therapeutic exercises will assure continued success.

Treatment procedures such as diuretics or surgery are not appropriate for lymphedema. Initially, a diuretic will decrease the water content and reduce swelling, but the protein molecules remain in the tissues and swelling will reoccur as soon as the drug loses its effectiveness. Surgical methods for lymphedema have not proven successful.

Wearing A Compression Garment

Wearing a compression garment provides external pressure to assist lymph drainage and hopefully prevent additional swelling. Although swelling is sometimes reversible, in most cases it is not and could lead to chronic lymphedema.

When you are about to engage in repetitive motions, such as exercise, cleaning, yard work, golf or tennis it is a good idea to wear a compression garment. It is also important to wear compression garment when you are flying. The decrease in cabin pressure in the airplane puts stress on the lymphatic and circulatory systems and this can increase swelling.

Graduated Compression Garments: Graduated compression garments are necessary to maintain the reduced limb and are designed to replace the bandages that were used earlier in the treatment. They are worn during the day while you are active. At night when you sleep, bandages or night garments are usually worn. The compression garments help to keep the swelling down, improve circulation, and prevent the re-accumulation of lymph fluid in the area. The garments must be worn every day, for life.

Pneumatic Compression Pumps: Some treatment may include use of a pneumatic compression pump. This mechanical device works as a sleeve with chambers that are intermittently inflated with air. This device is sometimes used in combination with CDT.

Skin Care: With lymphedema, the skin is usually dry and may crack easily, making it very susceptible to infections. A low-pH lotion, free of alcohol and fragrances should be used to maintain the moisture of the skin and to protect it. If an infection develops, consult your physician immediately!

Exercise: A skilled therapist may recommend an exercise program that is suited for your particular need and ability. An effective decongestive exercise program aids the muscular system to move lymph fluid out of the affected area. Any exercise that causes pain or muscle soreness should be discussed with a therapist. Moderate exercise such as swimming, walking, biking, light weight training and yoga are recommended. Overly aggressive sports that may cause injury should be avoided. Consult your physician before beginning any program.

LIFESTYLE – TIPS FOR MANAGING AND LIVING WITH LYMPHEDEMA

If you are at risk for developing lymphedema or already have it, these guidelines will help you prevent and manage the condition. Although you may not need to follow each suggestion, it is good to be aware of them.

If you have lymphedema, it is important that you avoid injury and overexertion in the affected area. You should wear the prescribed compression garments and/or bandages as instructed by your physician or therapist. Be sure all of your medical charts are updated and consider wearing a lymphedema alert bracelet available through the National Lymphedema Network.

Clothing & Jewelry

Avoid tight or restrictive clothing that may impair circulation or cause irritation and swelling. Shirt sleeves, bra straps, belts, socks and shoelaces should fit comfortably. Shoes with low heels are recommended. Jewelry, including watches, bracelets, and rings should not feel tight. Avoid carrying heavy purses, luggage and should bags on the side that is affected.

Skin Care

Keep skin protected using a moisturizing lotion and wash with a mild pH balanced soap. When bathing, water should be warm, not hot. Avoid irritating or allergy-causing cosmetics, detergents, deodorants, and perfumes. Inspect your feet, hands, and limbs regularly for skin changes since open skin invites bacteria and infection. Avoid cuts, pricks, scratches, burns, and insect bites that could increase swelling or promote infection. Use sunscreen and insect repellent regularly. Gloves are also a good protective measure for the hands when washing dishes, cooking, cleaning or working outdoors.

TRAUMA CAN ALSO INCREASE SWELLING & FURTHER DAMAGE THE LYMPHATIC SYSTEM

Avoid blood pressure checks, IV’s, blood draws, and shots in the affected limb. Do not cut into cuticles when trimming fingernails or toenails. Use an electric razor when shaving.

Proper Nutrition

Increased weight complicates lymphedema. Maintain a balanced diet of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and protein. Avoid excessive consumption of fatty foods, sweets, salt and alcohol. Drink plenty of water and unsweetened liquids.

Exercise

Moderate exercise such as swimming, walking, biking, light strength training and yoga are recommended. Overly aggressive sports that may cause injury should be avoided. Consult your physician before beginning a program.

Weather & Traveling

Always wear compression garments when flying or driving, as recommended by your physician or therapist. When traveling by car, be sure the seat belt is comfortable and make frequent stops since prolonged sitting may increase swelling. Avoid extreme changes in temperature (over 90 degrees or below zero), sunbathing, tanning beds, saunas, steam rooms, and hot tubs.


Athletic Therapy

Certified Athletic Therapists specialize in treating acute and chronic injuries to your muscles, bones, and joints. Best known for returning professional and elite athletes back to their sport after an injury, Certified Athletic Therapists use the same sports medicine approach to quickly rehabilitate your injury – resulting in faster recovery, reduced chance of further injury, and fewer visi... Read More

Certified Athletic Therapists specialize in treating acute and chronic injuries to your muscles, bones, and joints.

Best known for returning professional and elite athletes back to their sport after an injury, Certified Athletic Therapists use the same sports medicine approach to quickly rehabilitate your injury – resulting in faster recovery, reduced chance of further injury, and fewer visits to your healthcare professional.

A Certified Athletic Therapist utilizes contemporary rehabilitative techniques, therapeutic modalities, physical reconditioning and supportive strapping procedures to promote optimal healing and prepares the individual for safe reintegration into an active lifestyle.


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Located at:
575-7 River Glen Blvd, Oakville
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